#508 A Fading Murder, a Fracturing Convention

The Fade Out The Fade Out is Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser‘s nuanced, subtly told, complex story of Hollywood in 1948, revolving around a secret deal between a writer who can’t write because of PTSD sustained in the war and another writer who’s been blacklisted as a communist. We touch on some of our favorite little-noted details in the story.Why is Brubaker repeatedly attracted to “noir”-type stories? While Sean Phillips’ art is great, and he digests photo reference into his art better than some do, do some of the limitations of that method still show through? Tim and Brandon discuss.
Kumar journeyed so San Diego for the Comic-con this year, for the first time in twelve years. How has the event changed in that time? Who did Kumar get to meet this year? How did he work around the crowds? We get his report.
The Fade Out

#506 Drawing, Translating, Podcasting

Brandon_dragonPodcast co-founder Brandon talks about building a daily drawing regimen, using Scott Robertson’s How to Draw.

Then Kumar tells us about each of the various manga titles he’s recently translated. Looking for some good manga to read? Here are some ideas!

Finally, Tim talks about attempting to make podcasting profitable, and his self-published English study book and comic.

Below: a timetable of the episode, and more art from Brandon.

Continue reading #506 Drawing, Translating, Podcasting

#326 Three Views of San Diego Comicon

Three Views of San Diego ComiconThis week, Tim talks to three guys who participated in San Diego Comicon earlier this month, to see what their objectives were for being there, how it went, and their advice to SDCC newbies.

Dale Wilson, who wrote up his experience at BuyIndieComics.com, on why he left “unfulfilled” in some ways, but enjoyed it in other ways;

Justin Hall, who we last talked to in March of last year, on promoting his Fantagraphics book “No Straight Lines” and Prism Comics, as well as the sideline indie comics gathering Trickster; and

Robert Roach, a veteran of San Diego tabling, on his Japanese influences, networking, and more.

#295 Manga and American comics: Should the twain meet?

Marvel MangaverseDan Kanemitsu talks with Tim about how he and others in the manga industry have responded to the new Tokyo censorship law. The conversation also covers the differences, and interactions, between American and Japanese comics, the creative freedom enjoyed by women in Japanese comics, and much more.

#292 Women’s Issues

women's issues

At a panel at San Diego Comicon last month, Dan DiDio (bottom picture at left) caused a stir by seeming belligerent when a fan asked why the DC reboot included fewer female creators — even fewer than had worked on for DC pre-reboot. DiDio seemed to think there were hardly any female comics creators he could consider. Hear it here

Jake Ekiss was probably not alone in expressing disapproval of this sentiment — in this case, on Twitter. So Tim invited him to come on the podcast and discuss it here. (Jake’s comic is Solomon Azua.)

Joining Tim and Jake is one of those female comics creators the mainstream isn’t hiring, EK Weaver, creator of the Web comic The Less than Epic Adventures of TJ and Amal (that’s Amal in the top picture at left). We discuss why women are so much further out of the comics mainstream in the US than they are in, oh say, Japan.

Also this week, Tim’s former day-job office mate Cassey, now based in Anchorage, joins Tim to discuss Bryan Lee O’Malley’s pre-Scott Pilgrim work Lost at Sea, the coming-of-age story of 18-year-old Raleigh (middle picture).

#240 Kill “Shakespeare”

Approached by one of its co-authors, Tim, Mulele, and Kumar take him up on his suggestion to review “Kill Shakespeare” from IDW. However, we didn’t promise to like it.

Harvey Pekar, author of “American Splendor,” died recently at age 70. A remembrance of some of his work.

San Diego Comic-Con is over for another year. What are some things that we WISH would have been announced there?