#756 “Tokyo Rose – Zero Hour”

Tokyo RoseIf you’re at all aware of Tokyo Rose, it’s most likely simply as a woman heard over a radio in a movie set in World War II. But who was she, how did she end up in that situation, and what was the result for the war effort and for her? Tokyo Rose- Zero Hour is a new graphic novel by Andre Frattino and Kate Kasenow that fills us in on Iva Toguri, a Japanese-American woman who, under very odd circumstances, found herself working at Radio Tokyo during the war. Tim and Kumar review.

Iva Toguri demonstrates a sample broadcast

Toguri shooting some kind of a scripted scene

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Critiquing Comics #223: “Here 2 Cypher”

Here2Cypher

Here 2 Cypher is an anthology of stories written by Brandon Hayes, whose story Thready Tim and Jason enjoyed back in January. Does this set of stories stack up against that book? The guys evaluate the collection in this episode.

Here 2 Cypher‘s Kickstarter

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#361 “League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” marathon!

FLASHBACK! While this podcast has covered the odd League of Extraordinary Gentlemen book here and there, no one has dared think of trying to discuss all of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill‘s series in one episode… until now! Kumar and Dana take on the task, with special attention paid to Black Dossier (and the record that was recorded for it), the Century trilogy, and the injustice that Kumar feels was done to Volume 2 way back in 2006, episode 21!

(Originally published June 24, 2013. Re-presented in observance of the passing of League artist Kevin O’Neill.)

#755 “Best of EC Stories, Artisan Edition”

EC Comics, a name that brings to mind Fredric Wertham and the coming of the Comics Code, also brings to mind some very well-done comics by the likes of Wally Wood, Harvey Kurtzman, Al Williamson, and more. IDW has just released an Artist’s Edition of original EC art by Wood, Kurtzman, Williamson, Jack Davis, and Graham Ingels. Longtime EC fan Kumar is joined by the EC-curious Dana to discuss.

Read Squa Tront interview with Bernie Krigstein

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#754 “Peanuts”: Schulz’s Silent Sundays 1957-1961

Charles Schulz’s Peanuts is a master class in how to do a comic strip. This week Kumar and Tim are focusing on a five-year period of Schulz’s career, 1957 to 1961, and 25 Sunday strips that demonstrate Schulz’s skill at dialog-free comics. You might want to read the strips before listening; see below!

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Continue reading #754 “Peanuts”: Schulz’s Silent Sundays 1957-1961

#753 Kirby’s Fourth World: “Old Gods and New”

Old Gods and New

John Morrow is co-founder of Two Morrows Publishing, a company that owes its start to John’s interest in Jack Kirby. His Kirby fan newsletter grew into the company that’s now publishing his history of Kirby’s Fourth World, much of it told in Jack’s own words: Old Gods and New. This time, Emmet talks with John about Marvel’s fear that DC would end them after Kirby switched sides, how distribution quirks may have led to the premature end of the Fourth World books, how myth runs through all of Kirby’s work dating back to the ’30s, and more.

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Critiquing Comics #222: “Berserker Monk”

Berserker Monk

Berserker Monk is a violent, but slightly humorous, comic that’s been pitched as “Tarantino meets The Last Airbender.” The creators — Josh Thompson, Gabriel Roldan, Leland Bjerg — are currently kickstarting it. How are Tim and Jason feeling about this comic? Listen and find out.

#752 Shanti Rai’s “Sennen”

Sennen

What are the people like on the other side of the mountain? Are there any there? Where does the stuff, the objects, the food we enjoy in our daily lives come from? These questions are central to Shanti Rai‘s first graphic novel, Sennen. In this episode, Tim and Jason review the book, and then Tim talks to Shanti about how her bicultural background helped inspire the book, and the unexpected obstacle that slowed down its creation.

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#751 Rachel Pollack’s “Doom Patrol”

Doom Patrol

In the mid-’90s, Grant Morrison’s innovative run on Doom Patrol was followed by that of Rachel Pollack, who took advantage of Morrison’s legacy, the greatest variety of sexual minority characters of any mainstream comic at the time, to express her feelings about being trans and a lesbian herself. Her run also examines a number of standard comic book tropes. This run, which was far ahead of its time, has been unavailable in a collection for some time, but these issues (64 to 87) are finally to be made available this month in an omnibus. Kumar and Emmet discuss this gender-bending run.

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#750 Jack Kirby’s “The Demon”

The DemonAfter leaving DC’s Jimmy Olsen book, Jack Kirby needed something else to keep his monthly page count up to the level he had contracted for. One of the books he came up with was The Demon, the result of his being asked to do a “monsters and mystery” book. But Kirby didn’t have a lot of interest in that genre; was that to the disadvantage of the book, or to its advantage? Tim and Emmet discuss this 16-issue series.

The Bebop Bao Kickstarter

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