#760 “The Third Person”

The Third Person

What’s it like to be trans AND have Dissociative Identity Disorder? What’s it like to have a therapist who doesn’t have enough training to really help you? Emma Grove has experienced this and has produced an engaging memoir graphic novel, The Third Person, which exhibits an amazing memory for detail and a sharp understanding of the comics medium. Tim and Kumar review.

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Critiquing Comics #229: “Christiania”

Christiania

Christiania, a silent comic written by 13-year-old Abi Behe, is a take on the ills of social media by someone who has never lived in a world without online culture. But silent comics can be a storytelling challenge. How did artist Taka do on getting the story across? This time, Tim and Jason critique Christiania.

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Critiquing Comics #228: “Galacto: Pit Fighter” #2 “Requiem for a Humanzee”

Galacto 2

Kirt Burdick is back with the second issue of his hyper-violent science fiction comic Galacto: Pit Fighter, “Requiem for a Humanzee.” It’s good and bloody, but is it bloody good? Tim and Adam critique.

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#759 Kirby’s Fourth World(?): “Captain Victory, Graphite Edition”

Captain Victory

After he left DC Comics, but before he returned to produce Even Gods Must Die and The Hunger Dogs, Jack Kirby produced a sort of substitute Fourth World story called Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers, which was eventually published by Pacific Comics in 1981 and 82. Two Morrows publishing in 2003 released what it calls the Graphite Edition of Captain Victory, presenting Kirby’s photocopies of his pencils of the proposed 50-page Captain Victory graphic novel. This time, Emmet and Tim discuss the Graphite Edition and what Captain Victory tells us about Kirby and the Fourth World.

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Critiquing Comics #227: “Mayfield Eight” #1-#4

Mayfield Eight

“A biker revenge tale” isn’t a story pitch that appeals to everyone, but any kind of story can get a thumbs up if it’s well-done! This time Tim and Adam discuss the first four issues of Mayfield Eight, written and illustrated by Tim Larsen.

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Critiquing Comics #226: “Immortalis” #1 and #2

Immortalis

A few weeks back, Tim and Jason discussed Sean Lewis’ Immortalis— issue 3. This time, we’re reading the first two issues, and grasping, in some ways, why he made issue 3 first. But if you need to start with issue 3 to hook readers, isn’t that indicative of a problem with the first two issues?

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#758 “Ducks: Two Years in the Oil Sands”

Ducks

What happens when a group of people must work in the middle of nowhere, with virtually no supervision or accountability? Generally it’s not a good situation, as Kate Beaton, now well-known as the creator of the web comic Hark! A Vagrant, found in her younger years when she got a job on Alberta’s oil sands. This week, Kumar and Dana discuss her memoir of the experience, entitled Ducks: Two Years on the Oil Sands.

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Critiquing Comics #225: “Holy West” #1

Holy West

A supernatural western, Holy West, captivates Tim and Adam in this episode. The comic features smart writing by Seth Jacob and beautiful art by Daniel Irizarri. Now that we’ve given away whether we liked it, listen to the show and check out the comic!

Buy Holy West #1

Lettering tips from Nate Piekos

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#757 “Nemesis the Warlock”

Nemesis the Warlock
Kumar and Matt E celebrate the life and work of Kevin O’Neill with a look back at his breakout work on Nemesis The Warlock in 2000 A.D. with writer Pat Mills. O’Neill’s art very style in itself is shocking and intense, and the storytelling seems to approach everything backwards, but somehow it all comes together to create an unnerving and riveting sci-fi experience.

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Critiquing Comics #224: “Immortalis”

Immortalis

Immortalis is the story of a 19th-century woman, transplanted to the 21st, who is expected to be the world’s savior in a war between gods. But how did she get to the 21st century? Who is this team who has revived her? And… why did the creators start with issue 3? Tim and Jason try to answer these questions and give their opinions of the book.

Immortalis Kickstarter (funded!)

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