#659 “Locke & Key”

Locke and Key

This week, Kumar and Emmet review Locke and Key, by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez. There are a lot of murders in it, but is it a horror comic? They also discuss the series’ missteps in dealing with race and sexuality. Plus, in the second half of the show: Have you read this book but ended up with lots of questions? Emmet is here to help.

#560 Ted Anderson and “My Little Pony”

My Little Pony - Ted Anderson

My Little Pony is a toy line that initially had success in the ’80s (including TV and film appearances) but then stumbled until the 21st century. Its fourth iteration debuted in 2010, with a hit TV show My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic and more world building and continuity than before.

IDW has the license to make My Little Pony comics, and Ted Anderson is one of the writers on the book. Tim recently talked with him in Minneapolis about his approach to writing for kids, how he gets from a story concept to an actual story, the stumbling blocks in writing for a multimedia franchise, and more.

#433 Transformers!

TransformersThis week a look into the world of toy-based comics! Kumar and his brother Ilango discuss two recent IDW Transformers books, More Than Meets the Eye volume 1, and Transformers vs. G.I. Joe.

Music (from the 1986 film The Transformers (The Movie)):

  • “The Transformers (Theme)” by Lion
  • “The Death of Optimus Prime” by Vince DiCola

The quote that Kumar was trying to find: Continue reading #433 Transformers!

#288 “Changing Ways” and “Heroic: A Womanthology”

Changing Ways FLASHBACK! A creepy, rainy night. Mysterious red scars appearing on animals and people. Vicious wild pigs roam the streets. Justin Randall’s “Changing Ways” Book 1, published by Gestalt, reviewed by Tim and Brandon.
The Womanthology Heroic: A Womanthology, an anthology of comics created by women (some famous, others not yet) is currently in development and expected later this year from IDW. Tim talks to Athens-based participant Eugenia Koumaki, and IDW editor Mariah Huehner, about the background of and expectations for this project.

This episode was originally published August 1, 2011.

#370 Greeks bearing comics: “Falling for Lionheart” and “Amala’s Blade”

lionheart-amalaGreek comics creators are taking the English-speaking world by storm! … well, OK, maybe not. But Eugenia in Athens has pointed out there are at least two recent examples of comics by Greeks that have been released by American publishers. This week she talks with Tim about two of them: Falling for Lionheart by Ilias Kyriazis, and Amala’s Blade by Steve Horton and Michael Dialynas.

REVIEW: Richard Stark’s Parker, The Hunter

Adapted and illustrated by Darwyn Cooke

IDW, 2009.

Look, I’ll just say it.

I didn’t like it.

And it’s got nothing to do with Darwyn Cooke officially becoming a scab. I didn’t like it the first time I read it a year and a half ago, and I didn’t like it when I re-read it this week to write this review.

And yet here is a book that has been uniformly praised, as far as I can tell. I haven’t seen any dissent. And rightly so. The book is a masterpiece of craftsmanship. Cooke’s ability to construct a whole world in a near-minimalist style is astonishing. If the opening spread of New York doesn’t knock your socks off, nothing will. (Even though I’m sure Cooke didn’t “draw” it in any traditional sense.) I acknowledge all of that.

Continue reading REVIEW: Richard Stark’s Parker, The Hunter

#308 Not a Croc!

FrazettaWhat do writing cool Heavy Metal songs and writing comics have in common? Nothing! Absolutely nothing! Put down that pen, and go back to your guitar where you belong, headbanger! Rob Zombie, Scott Ian, and Glenn Danzig all share a mutual passion for comics, and had brilliant artists at their disposal, so what went wrong? Blind love of 70s creature features?  Sycophantic DC editors? An obsession with “croc-like creatures”?! Kumar and Dana attempt to wade through the muck…

REVIEW: Hundred Penny Press: Doctor Who Volume 2 #1

Written by Tony Lee, Art by Andrew Currie

IDW, 2011.

I’m no expert on Doctor Who, but even I know that the experience of the show is largely about which actor is playing the part: his facial expressions, his voice, his body language, his mannerisms.

To pull that off in comics, I think you need an artist who is exceptionally good with faces (I’m looking at you, Dave Gibbons), or you need to be a slave to photo reference. This comic does the latter with mixed success.

Continue reading REVIEW: Hundred Penny Press: Doctor Who Volume 2 #1

#304 Dungeons and Dragons

Dungeons and DragonsIs Dungeons and Dragons, a game that involves using your imagination to create an ongoing story, a good fit for a more “set” medium like comics? If you make the comic comprehensible only to D&D geeks, are the geeks any more likely to pick it up? D&D adherent Dana and lapsed adherent Kumar discuss.

REVIEW: Transformers #23

Written by: James Roberts

Art by: Alex Milne

Colors by: Joana Lafuente

Letters by Shawn Lee

IDW Publishing, August 2011

If you had told me 25 years ago that I would one day be reading a Transformers comic about senatorial politics, I would have said, “What’s senatorial politics?!”

Continue reading REVIEW: Transformers #23