#753 Kirby’s Fourth World: “Old Gods and New”

Old Gods and New

John Morrow is co-founder of Two Morrows Publishing, a company that owes its start to John’s interest in Jack Kirby. His Kirby fan newsletter grew into the company that’s now publishing his history of Kirby’s Fourth World, much of it told in Jack’s own words: Old Gods and New. This time, Emmet talks with John about Marvel’s fear that DC would end them after Kirby switched sides, how distribution quirks may have led to the premature end of the Fourth World books, how myth runs through all of Kirby’s work dating back to the ’30s, and more.

Brought to you by:

#752 Shanti Rai’s “Sennen”

Sennen

What are the people like on the other side of the mountain? Are there any there? Where does the stuff, the objects, the food we enjoy in our daily lives come from? These questions are central to Shanti Rai‘s first graphic novel, Sennen. In this episode, Tim and Jason review the book, and then Tim talks to Shanti about how her bicultural background helped inspire the book, and the unexpected obstacle that slowed down its creation.

Brought to you by:

#749 Marta Chudolinska: “An insider and an outsider”

babcia

Marta Chudolinska (who-doh-lean-ska), the child of Polish immigrants to Canada, makes comics and other art in Toronto. Koom talks with her about her ongoing project Babcia, about her grandmother and her family’s history in Poland.

Marta Chudolinska babcia2 babcia1

Brought to you by:

#747 “Suzanne: The Jazz Age Goddess of Tennis”

Suzanne

Suzanne Lenglen was a trendsetting tennis star in the 1920s, among the first to challenge the notion that tennis players had to be amateurs, running themselves into debt to keep competing, in order to participate in tournaments. Tom Humberstone‘s first full-length graphic novel Suzanne: The Jazz Age Goddess of Tennis, soon to be released, is a finely honed work of historical fiction on her life and influence. Tim and Jason review the book in this episode; then, Tim interviews Humberstone about the process of making the book, why he was inspired to focus on Lenglen, and what he hopes to do next.

Brought to you by:

#745 Noah Van Sciver and “Joseph Smith and the Mormons”

Joseph Smith and the Mormons

Joseph Smith and the Mormons is an objective look at the founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Author and artist Noah Van Sciver took a bit of heat from the church for not portraying things in line with church teaching. Adam interviews Noah in this episode, as they compare notes on moving on from their respective religious upbringings, plus Noah describes his process and tools, adjusting to fatherhood, and what kind of comics work to do next.

Brought to you by:

#741 Anneli Furmark

Walk Me to the Corner

Anneli Furmark is a Swedish illustrator and comics creator whose latest book is Walk Me to the Corner, in which two married middle-aged women become attracted to each other. Anneli talks with Koom (at the Toronto Comic Arts Festival) about why this book isn’t an LGBT book, about her painting technique and layout choices, and more.

Brought to you by:

#740 Gary Spencer Millidge (“Strangehaven”) interview

Strangehaven

Strangehaven is a series started by Gary Spencer Millidge in 1995. As he does everything himself (including publishing, for the first 18 issues), it has come out on an irregular schedule, but the content has been compelling. Kumar talks with him about how far he might be from completing the series, his process, his life-Strangehaven balance, and more.

Brought to you by:

#734 Ron Randall, “Trekker,” and Decompressed Storytelling

Trekker

What’s creator Ron Randall been up to since we talked with him last? He’s continuing his comic Trekker, now 35 years since its inception, and is up to his seventh Kickstarter for the series. He’s back to talk about that, plus he and Tim talk about the rise of decompressed storytelling in American comics over the past few decades, what caused its rise, and its pluses and minuses.

Brought to you by:

#725 Jim Rugg on “Street Angel” “Hulk: Grand Design” and more!

Street Angel

Jim Rugg is known for his indy hit Street Angel, for being half of the duo hosting the super-prolific Cartoonist Kayfabe videos series, and for illustrating other works such as Cecil Castellucci’s The Plain Janes. Now he’s about to be known for the Hulk retrospective Hulk: Grand Design. This time, Kumar talks with him about how the Hulk work came about, the development of Street Angel, his ever-changing artistic process, the making of Cartoonist Kayfabe, and more!

Brought to you by:

#714 Debbie Jenkinson

Ghosting is about a bus driver in a budding relationship with a woman who suddenly disappears from his life. Has he simply been ghosted? Or is there more to it? Emmet was captivated by the book (winner of the 2020 Best Irish Comic award), and this time he chats with its author (and fellow Ireland native), Debbie Jenkinson about this book and her forthcoming followup, the Dublin comics scene, how being an outsider affects the art one produces, and more.

Brought to you by: