#579 Helioscope: Fred Chao and Ron Randall

Fred Chao and Ron Randall

This week we wrap up both Tim’s visit to Heliscope Studio in Portland, and the whole three-month string of episodes from Tim’s trip around the US this past summer.

We’ll hear from Fred Chao about the double-edged sword of living in New York and how it informed his book Johnny Hiro: Half Asian, All Hero; how his approach to photos is really old-school; and his Kickstarted childrens’ book Alison and Her Rainy Day Robot.

Then, veteran comics artist Ron Randall on the right and wrong ways to use photo reference, his experience pencilling from an Alan Moore Swamp Thing script; his creator-owned project from the ‘80s, Trekker, and why he’s reviving it now; attending the nerd Mardi Gras; and why we’re living in a golden age of comics!

Critiquing Comics #119: “The Ferocious Five”

The Ferocious Five

Our friend Kristin Tipping is back, this time as the artist on a graphic novel written by Jason Vandervort called The Ferocious Five. Their recent attempt to Kickstart the project failed; what should they do differently next time?

#536 “Black Ink”: African-Americans in Comics

Black Ink

Since we often don’t see the people who make the comics we read, we may not realize just how many African-American comics creators there are. Craig Rippon is gathering their thoughts and opinions in a documentary film called Black Ink. This week, Tim gets the scoop from Craig on who has been interviewed so far and the plan going forward, the pros and cons of publishing a “multicultural” line of comics, the state of black heroes at Marvel, his motivation to keep going on the film, and more.

Critiquing Comics #104: “Ned & Annie” + more

Ned & Annie

The unidentified creator of the strip Ned & Annie promises to “bring back funny comics.” Does the comic succeed on those terms? What makes a comic funny (or not)?

Also, responding to a comment on CCP #102 comic “Yiffing in Hell“, Mulele on “Mindgator“, Tim on “To the Batpoles!” and a followup on last Monday’s DCP on how the podcast might evolve.

Critiquing Comics #102: “Yiffing in Hell”

Yiffing in Hell

Yiffing in Hell: Episode I – Secret Reunion in Carfax Lodge is a graphic novel by Mexican artist Geladaa. The slogan “A book you will know less about after putting it down than before picking it up” sets off some pretty major alarm bells, but Tim and Mulele forge ahead to investigate.

#505 Tiny Daredevil Hands and a Potato-Powered Bike

This week (and next), we turn the mic back on ourselves. What, in terms of comics, are we doing?

Frank Miller’s Daredevil and the Ends of HeroismFirst up, Paul, To the Batpoles co-host and occasional DCP contributor, talks about his book Frank Miller’s Daredevil and the Ends of Heroism , which will be out soon! In it, Paul reflects on how Miller’s Daredevil changed comics — and Paul.

 

 

The Mindgator

 

Then, Mulele catches us up on The Mindgator — soon to be Kickstarting volume 2 — and the new edition of his black cat comic Elbis!

#504 Kawai Shen: The Internet in comics, tabling for introverts, and more

Kawai ShenOn the Cute Juice Comics blog, Kawai Shen recently wrote a post about problems with representing the Internet in comics and other media. On this week’s show she talks with Tim about the Net in comics, this year’s TCAF, convention tabling for introverts, following up on convention contacts, the Dirty Diamonds anthology, and Canadian government grants for artists… even comics artists!

PLUS: Simon Fraser, co-creator of the Nikolai Dante series in 2000 A.D., talks about the Dare2Draw project, and the involvement of Mike Baron and Steve Rude’s Nexus in their proposed anthology.

Become a patron! If you pledge at least $3 a month through Patreon, you can access additional audio of Tim’s talk with Kawai Shen, on writing about members of marginalized groups — or simply about cultures the writer isn’t familiar with. Example: Fifty Shades of Grey!

#493 The Dangers of Satire (But don’t back down!)

Charlie HebdoThe panel discussion “You can get killed doing this: sketches from the satire biz” was held at the recent MoCCA Fest in New York. The panel discussed the chilling effects on what satirical works get published, and why it’s important to keep publishing satire anyway. The blurb in the festival’s booklet reads in part: “Can satire survive in a world of trigger warnings and Kalishnikov triggers? Could the National Lampoon be published in a post-Charlie Hebdo world? Is self-censorship the greatest sin of all?” This week we present an excerpt of that discussion.

It was led by Rick Meyerowitz, formerly of National Lampoon, and featured political cartoonist Steve Brodner, former National Lampoon co-editor Sean Kelly, and cartoonist Peter Kuper.

Also: Tim meets up with Mike Seid, Rahsaan Romain, and John Lee at the New York Aspiring Comic Creators Club meetup!

#489 Tapastic’s Michael Son & The Rattler’s Jason McNamara

TapasticTapastic is one of the many places online that you could put your comic. Why put it there? This week, Tapastic Editor-in-chief Michael Son joins Tim to explain the advantages of the site, issues they’re working to solve, what kind of audience is reading the site (and how reader demands have changed), and what new features are in the pipeline.

The RattlerJason McNamara is back with us after two years, and now his book with Greg Hinkle, The Rattler, has just been published by Image! He joins us to talk about the disturbing inspiration for the book, how the 2014 Kickstarter project for the book helped it get published, and more.

 

Critiquing Comics #086: Holy F*cked

holyfkedNick Marino and Arruda Massa are back with Holy F*cked, the follow-up to their highly irreverent comedy Holy F*ck, starring Jesus and Satan in a romantic relationship. Does this book hold a candle to the first? Tim and Mulele discuss.

Also, a progress report on Mulele’s ongoing Kickstarter project!