#546 “The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye”

Charlie Chan Hock Chye


Why read a biography of a fictional comics artist? What if it’s also a history of Singapore — done in a style that apes more than a dozen seminal 20th century comics creators? Tim and Kumar take a look at the awe-inspiring (yet sometimes puzzling) Sonny Liew graphic novel The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye.

#537 Joey Alison Sayers

Joey Alison Sayers

This week, Tim talks with with cartoonist Joey Alison Sayers. She’s done work for MAD magazine, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, the Nib, GoComics and more, plus a couple of books about her coming out as transgender. Why did she disappear for a few years? Why did she come back to comics? Plus the best advice she knows for new creators, and more.

Critiquing Comics #104: “Ned & Annie” + more

Ned & Annie

The unidentified creator of the strip Ned & Annie promises to “bring back funny comics.” Does the comic succeed on those terms? What makes a comic funny (or not)?

Also, responding to a comment on CCP #102 comic “Yiffing in Hell“, Mulele on “Mindgator“, Tim on “To the Batpoles!” and a followup on last Monday’s DCP on how the podcast might evolve.

#528 Lenny Schwartz: Comics and the Theatre, Act III

Co-Creator

While we’ve talked before with Austin Tichenor and John Roberson about adapting comics to the stage, we’ve never talked about (or even thought about!) adapting the lives of comics creators to that stage! But Lenny Schwartz has done it, and more than once, writing and directing “Co-Creator” (about Bill Finger and his claim to the Batman legacy) and “The Man Who Saw Snoopy” (about Charles Schulz, of course!). And he has another in the works on Spider-Man co-creator Steve Ditko.

This week Lenny tells Tim about writing these plays, just how much credit Bob Kane and Stan Lee may actually deserve, how Schulz used Peanuts as his diary, and much more.

# 519 “Bizarro” creator Dan Piraro

Bizarro

When Dan Piraro started his cartoon “Bizarro“, some of the factors you might expect were involved in the decision, but the Superman character wasn’t one of them! Dan wasn’t into superhero comics; in this episode we hear the rather, er, bizarro story of how he learned of his strip’s non-namesake (it involves Jerry Seinfeld!); how The Far Side blazed a trail for Bizarro (not in the way you might think!); if having a syndicated comic is still a good deal (if, in fact, it ever was); his forays into fine art, vaudeville, and coloring books; and much more.

#518 Joe Dator, New Yorker cartoonist

Joe Dator - manspreading

Single-panel cartoons, while not sequential art, certainly have some things in common with sequential art, and some cartoonists (Hank Ketcham, Bil Keane) have alternated between the two in their daily work. This week, in the first of two interviews with single-panel creators, Tim talks with New Yorker cartoonist Joe Dator.

What’s it like trying to get your joke across in exactly one panel — and get the darn thing published in a highly competitive venue like the pages of the New Yorker? How did the Far Side influence single-panels? (Perhaps less than you think!) What is the Mount Everest of cartooning? What cartoonists influenced Joe most? And – why does he spend his free time making a comedy podcast about classic rock?

#331 The End of the Road for “Cul de Sac”

culdesacFLASHBACK! Richard Thompson passed away on July 27, 2016. As his strip Cul de Sac ended four years ago, Tom Spurgeon joined Tim to bid it a fond farewell, and this week we re-present that episode in memory of Thompson.

We discuss some favorite moments of Cul de Sac, compare it with other classic strips such as Peanuts, examine what Thompson (and any other relatively new creator of newspaper strips) was up against as technology and economics teamed up against print media, and — Hey! Watch out for the UH-OH BABY!!

Originally published September 17, 2012

#501 The Billy Ireland Museum

The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum The Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum, on the campus of Ohio State University, houses the world’s largest collection of comic strip tear sheets and clippings, and also archives original art, manuscript materials, and other comics-related items. This week Caitlin McGurk, Associate Curator at the museum, talks to Tim about Milton Canniff’s connection to the museum, the challenges of art preservation, some highlights of the museum’s holdings, and more.

#493 The Dangers of Satire (But don’t back down!)

Charlie HebdoThe panel discussion “You can get killed doing this: sketches from the satire biz” was held at the recent MoCCA Fest in New York. The panel discussed the chilling effects on what satirical works get published, and why it’s important to keep publishing satire anyway. The blurb in the festival’s booklet reads in part: “Can satire survive in a world of trigger warnings and Kalishnikov triggers? Could the National Lampoon be published in a post-Charlie Hebdo world? Is self-censorship the greatest sin of all?” This week we present an excerpt of that discussion.

It was led by Rick Meyerowitz, formerly of National Lampoon, and featured political cartoonist Steve Brodner, former National Lampoon co-editor Sean Kelly, and cartoonist Peter Kuper.

Also: Tim meets up with Mike Seid, Rahsaan Romain, and John Lee at the New York Aspiring Comic Creators Club meetup!

#483 Think Pink! Mark Arnold on DePatie-Freling, Li’l Jinx, and more

Pink PantherIf you’re listening to this podcast, you’ve probably at some point encountered (if not read) a history of DC or Marvel. But how about Harvey Comics? or Cracked Magazine? And if you’re into animation, perhaps you’d like a history of DePatie-Freling or Total Television Productions?

Comics and animation historian Mark Arnold has been compiling info on these companies and more. He also discusses Joe Edwards’ Li’l Jinx strip, that time when Blondie had a comic book, why Wonderful World of Disney seldom showed cartoons, and the storage challenges inherent in his chosen profession!