#657 “Berlin”

Berlin

Jason Lutes’ Berlin shows us scenes from the lives of many characters in Berlin as the Weimar Republic disintegrated and the Nazis rose to power. Historical events (including the fallout of World War I) affect the characters while the characters continue trying to control their own lives, or each other’s, and they cross paths in ways that are sometimes easy to miss. And the art is detailed and spellbinding. Tim and Kumar dig into this 542-page masterwork, more than twenty years in the making.

Jason Lutes’ presentation

#598 Dylan Horrocks looks back at “Hicksville”

Hicksville

Twenty years after the first collection of Hicksville was released, creator Dylan Horrocks talks to Emmet about how the comic looks to him now. Some of the work’s commentary on the comics industry turned out to presage subsequent developments, and in some cases he ended up not going far enough! Also, his source for a Jack Kirby quote that many experts were unaware of; the public’s misinterpretation of the term “graphic novel”; the explosion of female and minority comics creators, especially outside of the Big Two; and more.

#559 Drawn & Quarterly and Canadian comics

This week a wide-ranging discussion between two Canadians about comics in Canada. The talk centers on Montreal-based publisher Drawn & Quarterly, and two books from their catalog: Michel Rabagliati’s 2005 book Paul Moves Out, and the latest from Jillian Tamaki, Boundless. Also, some deep background on the history and people behind Toronto comics shop The Beguiling.

#556 Vanessa Davis

Vanessa Davis

Vanessa Davis is an L.A.-based creator of autobio comics Spaniel Rage, Make Me A Woman and Out of Time. Koom has been an admirer of her work, and this week he talks with her in depth about whether she sees herself as part of a “movement”; the pitfalls of reporting in your comics on what your family members do (like that time with her mom in the museum…); how her parents affected the direction of her art; and much more.

#553 “Wilson”: the comic, the movie

Wilson

Daniel Clowes’ 2010 graphic novel Wilson tells the story of a guy who can’t help but tell you exactly how he feels about you, and the pain which that attitude hides. Earlier this year, a movie version of the book was released, starring Woody Harrelson. How do the book and film compare?

This week, two sets of DCP regulars approach “Wilson” from different angles. First, Tim and Mulele review the book; then, Kumar and Emmet discuss the movie.

#551 R. Sikoryak


Robert Sikoryak is known for adopting the styles of various famous comics and mashing them up with classic literature, Donald Trump quotes, and even the iTunes user agreement. This week he talks with Koom how he chooses the specific pairings of comics titles and other content, why he didn’t want to do his book on Trump, what Kafka’s Metamorphosis and Schulz’s Peanuts have in common, getting inside the head of the creator whose work he’s parodying, and more.

#452 Joe Matt’s “The Poor Bastard”

poorbastardJoe Matt was one of ‘The Toronto Three’ in the 90’s; he was a no-holds barred autobiographical cartoonist who, with his friends Chester Brown and Seth, ushered in the first wave of Drawn and Quarterly work. Matt drew attention for his sense of humor as well as exposing the depraved corners of his life, including porn addiction, excessive cheapness, and an increasingly destructive relationship with his girlfriend Trish. Kumar and Koom discuss The Poor Bastard and reflect about encountering Matt’s work, the interaction between real life and representation, and the connection between humor and depravity.

LINK: Did the woman Frankie was modeled after demand to be left out of Joe’s comic?

#448 “A Drifting Life”: Memoir and manga history

A Drifting LifeYoshihiro Tatsumi, although he was a somewhat influential figure in the manga of the 1950s and ’60s, is largely forgotten in Japan today. However, within the past 10 years he has gained some belated fame in the West, thanks largely to the efforts of Adrian Tomine and Drawn & Quarterly.

Tatsumi passed away last month, prompting Tim and Kumar to finally pull his comics memoir (which also includes considerable amounts of 1950s manga history) A Drifting Life off the shelf and do a review! And here it is.

#130 “Scott Pilgrim” and “Paul Has a Summer Job”

FLASHBACK!  Tim and Brandon review of two Canadian coming-of-age comics: The first three volumes of Bryan Lee O’Malley’s “Scott Pilgrim” series, and “Paul Has a Summer Job” by Michel Rabagliati.

Listen carefully, because later this month, Tim and Cassey will discuss the entire series, and Tim’s take on it has changed…

ALSO: Give today to the Deconstructing Comics pledge drive!

Originally published June 2, 2008

#423 Rutu Modan: Emotional depth, tight plots

Exit WoundsIsraeli graphic novelist Rutu Modan has won acclaim for her books Exit Wounds (2007) and The Property (2013), both of which are so tightly plotted, with a number of twists and turns, that Tim and Kumar find them difficult to review spoiler-free. What’s remarkable, though, is the emotional depth in books that are so plot-driven, as well as their social commentary on Israeli society, how violence there has become banal, and the popularity of Jewish tours of Polish sites of the Holocaust. With all this going for the books, we simply have to talk about them! (With few spoilers!)