#724 “Young Shadow”

Young Shadow

Superheroes are the stuff of kids’ fantasies. Who among us hasn’t fantasized about having powers, putting on a costume and fighting crime? Ben Sears’ graphic novel Young Shadow is a presentation of this fantasy: a costumed kid with no superpowers but excellent fighting skills and a neighborhood network that helps him patrol the streets – because the cops can’t be trusted to do so. Tim is joined by Ryan Cecil Smith to review this fun but potentially controversial all-ages book.

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#701 Barry Windsor-Smith’s “Monsters”

MonstersA story originally conceived as an Incredible Hulk tale in — really — the 1980s, Barry Windsor-Smith‘s Monsters has finally seen the light of day. How is it? Kumar and Dana find it a joy to look at, and containing a number of astonishing scenes and mind-blowing plot points, but also to have some serious drawbacks. Does the good outweigh the bad? Here’s their review.

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#699 “How to Be Happy”

How to be Happy

In this episode Kumar Sivasubramanian (psst our Eisner nominated member of the Deconstructing Comics team) and Emmet O’Cuana discuss Eleanor Davis‘s comics. Focusing mainly on her collection How To Be Happy and one-shot Libby’s Dad, the comic creator’s use of subtle sadness and surreal humor inspires a wide- ranging conversation (including how to be happy during a plague!).

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#637 “Ghost World” haunts us still

Ghost World

Daniel Clowes’ 1990s series Ghost World became a movie in 2001. Will Weaver, a professor at John Carroll University, says that each version of the story was what it needed to be for that medium. Why did those choices, such as adding Seymour, make sense for the movie? Could a film version have worked without Seymour? And what’s the deal with that bus, anyway? Will joins Tim to discuss these questions and more.

Comic Journal review of the movie, by Michael Dean

Daniel Clowes interview in Salon

#613 “My Favorite Thing is Monsters”

My Favorite Thing is Monsters

My Favorite Thing is Monsters is a horror-movie-influenced graphic novel set against the tumult of the U.S. in the 1960s. What’s stunning is that it’s the first published work for Emil Ferris, but it’s very accomplished. Kumar and Emmet review.

#604 Ho Che Anderson and “Godhead”

Godhead

Why does Ho Che Anderson, who has had several projects (including his latest, Godhead) published by Fantagraphics, call himself a “failed” comics creator? What does he wish he’d done differently, early in his career? In this episode, he talks to Koom about going to art school vs. making your comics mistakes in public (and how Frank Miller succeeded despite doing the latter), Godhead, his film work, and more.

#588 We love “HATE”

HATE

Peter Bagge’s HATE was an amazing hit for a ’90s indy comic, outselling some Big Two titles. Tim, Kumar, and Tom Spurgeon talk about some of the amazing aspects of this strip, and discuss whether it’s accurate to classify it as a comic about slackers.

#548 Jaime Hernandez

Jaime Hernandez

Love and Rockets continues to impress, and in this episode Koom asks creator Jaime Hernandez some burning questions. Hernandez talks about writing Maggie and Hopey, the dynamics of working on something with your brother, why he gravitates toward female characters, his influences and art style, and more.

Also, Tim and Mulele discuss the current state of the US comics market and Marvel’s recent problems.

#538 “Patience”

Patience

Dan Clowes’ 2016 graphic novel Patience has elements of science fiction, mystery, and psychedelia. It’s an interesting mix, but… was the sci-fi part really necessary? Kumar and Dana give it their usual thorough review.

#517 “Kramers Ergot” 9

Kramer's Ergot 9The ninth issue of Kramers Ergot is finally available. This week, Kumar and Ryan discuss the feel of the book overall (does it feel a bit more scattered than past editions?), as well as discussing individual stories by the likes of Adam Buttrick, Kim Deitch, Dash Shaw, Baptiste Virote, Abraham Diaz, Andy Burkholder, Manuel Fiore, Steve Weissman, Gabrielle Bell, and Michael Deforge.