Critiquing Comics #201: “Adora and the Distance”

AdoraAlthough it’s currently only available digitally, Adora and the Distance, by Marc Bernardin, Ariela Kistantina, Bryan Valenza, and Bernardo Brice, has garnered a fair amount of mainstream attention (Vanity Fair, Syfy) — reportage that doesn’t even seem aware of the fact that it’s spoiling the book’s twist ending. Of course, we’ll have to spoil it in this episode as well (though we’ll warn you first!). But, might it have been better to reveal that information at the start of the book, anyway? Tim and newcomer Rachelle Meyer (whose book was previously discussed on this show) critique.

#704 “Excelsior! The Amazing Life of Stan Lee”

Excelsior!
Continuing with “How Much Stan Can You Stand?”, this time Tim and Emmet take on Stan Lee’s 2002 memoir (with George Mair), Excelsior! The Amazing Life of Stan Lee. How does it differ from his later memoir Amazing Fantastic Incredible?

Have you had all the Stan you can stand? Or should we review more books on The Man? Let us know in the comments!

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#703 “Far Sector”

Far Sector

NK Jemisin and Jamal Campbell‘s Far Sector takes the Green Lantern concept (it’s published by DC) to comment on race relations and the police. Emmet and Kumar discuss the book’s storytelling strategy; whether main character Jo has made a believable choice in becoming a (space) cop; compare novelist Jemisin to other prose writers who have taken on writing comics; and more.

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Critiquing Comics #200: “.357 Magnum Opus”

.357 Magnum OpusTwo bounty hunters are recruited for another job. A woman is seen topless, numerous people get their brains blown out, men and women get amorous on a hair-trigger, and quips and oddball observations are the order of the day. A ’90s Tarentino-esque film? No, it’s graphic novel .357 Magnum Opus, by Ghezal Omar with art by MingChen Shen. Tim and Jason come in with guns blazing.

Critiquing Comics #199: “Amazing Grace”

Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace is a Webtoon comic by Shane Berryhill and Mike Salter, featuring sword fights with Dracula, women with plunging necklines, and, sometimes, chapter endings that lack punch. Tim and Adam try to diagnose, and give prescriptions for, what ails this comic, while recognizing that it’s not too far from being well-done.

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#701 Barry Windsor-Smith’s “Monsters”

MonstersA story originally conceived as an Incredible Hulk tale in — really — the 1980s, Barry Windsor-Smith‘s Monsters has finally seen the light of day. How is it? Kumar and Dana find it a joy to look at, and containing a number of astonishing scenes and mind-blowing plot points, but also to have some serious drawbacks. Does the good outweigh the bad? Here’s their review.

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#700 Amazing, Fantastic, Incredible….Nostalgic

Amazing Fantastic Incredible

“How much Stan can you stand?” Tim and Emmet’s look at books on Stan Lee continues with The Man’s graphic novel-memoir Amazing Fantastic Incredible, by Stan Lee, Peter David, and Colleen Doran. Can we recommend it?

Listen to the MMMS record

1:18:40 Also, Tim looks back at a few of the many high points in the history of Deconstructing Comics, complete with old show clips!

#224 Our Notes on “Death Note”

#165 Mo Willems’ Dirty Little Secret

#173 Diamond and the U.S. Comics Market

#595 Mulele and other DCP connections at TCAF

#564 T-Rex and CXC

#299 Detroit Metal City vs. Metalocalypse Dethklok

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#699 “How to Be Happy”

How to be Happy

In this episode Kumar Sivasubramanian (psst our Eisner nominated member of the Deconstructing Comics team) and Emmet O’Cuana discuss Eleanor Davis‘s comics. Focusing mainly on her collection How To Be Happy and one-shot Libby’s Dad, the comic creator’s use of subtle sadness and surreal humor inspires a wide- ranging conversation (including how to be happy during a plague!).

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#698 Tony Stark, Futurist

Iron Man

In the 21st century, Tony Stark (alter ego of Iron Man) has been evolving into an Elon Musk-type “futurist.” What are the reasons for this change? Has it done anything to expand the kinds of stories that can be told with the character? Has Stark ever even really worked as a sympathetic character? Emmet calls up self-described “strategy & foresight practitioner” (and comics geek) Matt Finch to discuss these points and more.