Critiquing Comics #161: “Dog vs. Ultra-Dog” and “Chad in Amsterdam #3”

Dog vs Ultra-Dog + Chad in Amsterdam #3

In this episode, we discuss:

  • Dog vs. Ultra-Dog, by Troy Wilson and Clayton Hanmer. Where does it come down on the children’s book – children’s comic continuum?
  • Chad in Amsterdam #3 by Chad Bilyeu. The latest issue from one of our favorites.

Plus, some creepy movie CGI in “cute” films.

Critiquing Comics #160: “Shika-Machi Journals” & “Garage Band”

Shika-machi Journals and Garage Band

In this episode, we discuss:

  • The Shika-Machi Journals, by Victor Edison. The start of his comics history of the Japanese town where he lives starts out with Japanese creation myth. What do we think of his retelling of these stories?
  • Garage Band, by Jason D and Celia Tian. The beautifully-drawn story of three …unlikeable teenagers.

Plus: Of course we have to publicize our comics, podcasts, and so on, and our crowdfunding for them. But when does all-out self-promotion become off-putting?

Critiquing Comics #158: “Bronze Age Boogie” and “Longdog”

Bronze Age Boogie + Longdog

In this episode, Tim and Mulele discuss:

  • Bronze Age Boogie, by Stuart Moore and Alberto Ponticelli. An ambitious comic that tries to cram in too many ideas. The Bronze Age! ’70s pop culture! Time-traveling apes! Prose interludes! Meanwhile, the book’s backup feature is the bomb! Has Ahoy Comics gotten things backwards?
  • Longdog, by Josh Hechinger and Jorge Munoz. The authors of one of our very early critiques are back together with a story of Sasquatch hunting. It looks good, but is the tone a bit inconsistent?

Also, Mulele tells a story of recent tragic headlines here in Japan and how they intersect with comics and his life.

Critiquing Comics #154: “Some Strange Disturbances” and Tim sees a Marvel movie!

Strange Disturbances & Capt Marvel

This time, we diverge from the normal format and discuss a variety of topics:

1:17 Writer Craig Hurd-McKenny sent us three of his LGBTQ+-friendly comics, and we discuss them all: The Magic If (art by Gervasio, Melisa Jones, and Tyler Smith-Owings), The Brontes: Infernal Angria (art by Rick Geary), and Some Strange Disturbances (art by Gervasio, Carlos Aon, and Tyler Smith-Owings).

32:16 In Deconstructing Comics last week, Tim talked to some comics retailers in Chicago about the state of the industry. Tim and Mulele react to the retailers’ comments.

55:17 Tim talks about the movies he saw during his visit to the U.S.: Captain Marvel, Dumbo, and Shazam!

1:26:53 We read mail from creators whose comics we’ve discussed in past episodes.

#623 Remembering Ed; Asking retailers

Chicago Ed, Retailers

When someone you know, someone who had an impact on your life, leaves us too soon, it can be tough to process. Struggling to accept the 2017 death of comics creator and all-around renaissance man Ed Siemienkowicz (who appeared in DCP episodes 227 and 393) at age 43, Tim spent part of his recent visit to Chicago meeting some of Ed’s friends and family, to commiserate and share memories — and check the progress of Ed’s comic that his friends are finishing for him.

Also, Tim talks to Hamster Rage creator Brian Crowley about his ongoing Kickstarter and the state of the U.S. comics industry, and visits three Chicago comics retailers to see how healthy the comics market seems from their perspective, and how it could be better.

Challengers Comics

Graham Crackers Comics

G-mart Comics

Ed’s cousin Kristen, drawing group friend Garry Vettori, sister Renee, brother Bob, Tim, aunt Carol, online gaming friend Darrell Degreve

Tim, Kristen, Carol, Brian Crowley

Ed carved this Cesar Romero Joker into cardboard, and then spray-painted it green!

Ed with a bus he designed when he was employed by the Golf Channel.

#600 “Sky Doll: Sudra” and DCP history!

Six hundred episodes! How’d we do that?

A double-header to celebrate. First, Tim and Eugenia discuss the long-, long-awaited next installment of the Sky Doll saga, Sky Doll: Sudra. Alessandro Barbucci and Barbara Canepa continue to astound with their beautiful artwork and colors. But is the story a satisfying next chapter?

Then, in honor of the big, round number on this episode, we present audio of Tim’s presentation on the history of Deconstructing Comics at the Tokyo Sequential Art Meetup last February 15!

Critiquing Comics #136: “Tales from the Interface”

Tales from the Interface

Emmanuel Filteau’s surreal and interesting Tales from the Interface is worth a look — even if you’re not quite sure what you’re looking at. Tim and Mulele discuss.

Critiquing Comics #135: “Hyper Epics” and Mulele’s missing box

Hyper Epics

Hyperepics.com is a site showcasing a growing number of three-page comics, more or less of the “Amazing Stories” mold. In this episode we read many of them and talk about what we liked, and what we didn’t.

In the most recent Deconstructing Comics, Mulele told Koom about the box of his wares that didn’t make it to TCAF. In this episode, Mulele gives us an update on his box and a look back at the overall TCAF experience.

Plus, some listener mail!

About “On Syntaphore” in Spanish

#595 Mulele and other DCP connections at TCAF

TCAF 2018

Koom’s visit to Toronto Comic Arts Festival 2018 included several table interviews and a longer wrap-up interview with Mulele on the process of signing up for TCAF, the many roadblocks he ran into on the trip itself, the payoff of attending, how TCAF compares with Tokyo cons, and more.

(larger photos and time stamps below)

Harmony Becker

1:26 Harmony Becker, who tabled at Kaigai Manga Festa in Tokyo last year and was interviewed by Tim here, gives us an update

Mark Laliberte and Jonation Dyck

4:36 Mark Laliberte and Jonathan Dyck of the 4 Panel anthology

Molly Muldoon

7:58 Molly Muldoon, co-writer of the graphic novel Dead Weight with past DCP guest Terry Blas

Mulele

11:50 Mulele‘s TCAF story

Critiquing Comics #134: “Fallen Ones” and “The Five of Us”

Fallen Ones - The Five of UsA werewolf. A female assassin. A grieving father. Varga Balint Bank and Vadas Mate’s Fallen Ones weaves their stories together in a well-thought-out way.

The Five of Us: It All Starts Here, from Sean Conway, Bangkit Myarso, Arief Reza Erlangga, and Dreadink, gives us a group of young African-American men who happen onto Power Rangers-type powers. Yeah, but what’s the actual story here?

Tim and Mulele review.