Critiquing Comics #170 “Moon You”

Moon You

You’re trapped on the moon and you believe that everyone on Earth is dead. Who’d have believed that was the setup for a gag manga? Cho Seok pulls it off in style with Moon You, a hilarious comic that also has heart and some tension, and, yes, a few missteps as well. Tim and Mulele discuss.

Also, what our Patrons said when we asked them what type of podcast content – critiques? superhero movie review? comics industry talk? – we’re the best at presenting.

 

Critiquing Comics 146: “Alex” and “Undetermined”

Alex & Undetermined

Alex is a Webtoons comic about the life of Alexander the Great, by Dave Malley. How much were we able to learn about the comic’s subject?

Andrew Perry and Chris Holmes’ Undetermined centers on a middle-school boy, Robert, who is running into people – including himself — from other dimensions, and they’re getting injured by his actions. What’s going on, and what can Robert do to solve the problem?

Tim and Mulele critique.

#484 Badguys and Atomic Sheep

Two interviews this week:

First, Luke Lancaster and Orlando Caicedo on their comic “The Badguys.” How did they got together (without actually getting together) and get their comic into Webtoons? And, are Webtoons actually comics?
Then, UK-based artist and writer Sally Jane Thompson, author of the graphic novel “Atomic Sheep”, explains why a creator with South African and Canadian roots sees the UK as a better place to be, how comics can be used in conjunction with an art exhibit, and more.

#481 Digital comics!

Comixology & WebtoonThe digital comics universe continues to expand. This week, Tim looks at two different platforms.

If you’re into American comics at all, you no doubt know of Comixology. Since we last talked to company co-founder John Roberts, Comixology has joined the Amazon family, and their integration is starting to become visible on both companies’ sites. John talks about this, the penetration of digital in the market, how to get your comics into Comixology, and more.

South Korean Web giant Naver started Webtoon in that country back in 2004, and since then its reach has grown in Asia and around the world — the English version is called Line Webtoon. We meet Webtoon content manager David Lee and New Mexico-based creator Stephen McCranie (whose Space Boy is available through Webtoon) to discuss the site’s reach and business model, the differences between making a comic for print and making one that the reader scrolls through, and how to get your comics into Webtoon.