#235 Iron Man 2

Iron Man 2 finally opened here in Japan a month after it did in the States. Having just gotten around to watching the first Iron Man movie at home (hey! He’s been busy!), Tim joins Mulele for a theater viewing of IM2.

Also, an early ’70s issue of The Invincible Iron Man drawn by Herb Trimpe, with an impressive turnaround time.

#165 Mo Willems’ Dirty Little Secret

PigeonFLASHBACK! Children’s book writer Mo Willems has been found out: he’s actually a comics creator! He talks to Tim about the state of American comics for kids, the effect of his animation background on his approach to creating books, and… just why does that pigeon want to drive a bus, anyway?! (Originally published Feb 2, 2009)

#234 Race Issues in Comics

Comics have come a long way since Milton Caniff could put a hideous Chinese stereotype in a family newspaper, or create a racist World War II guide to telling “Japs” from Chinese people — right? Well… but what about those papers today that only want one “black strip”Candorville or Curtis, but not both? The top ranks of Marvel & DC heroes are overwhelmingly white — and, thanks to “regressive storytelling” at DC, they’re becoming more so. Black heroes, Hispanic heroes, seldom have their own titles. And, oh by the way — how about some characters with roots in India? Please? Tim, Kumar, and Mulele discuss the past history of racism — intentional and not — in American comics, and the present-day reality of most comics’ racial non-diversity. Also: Why Canadian-citizen Kumar never cared about Alpha Flight!

Links, links, and more links:

#233 Bears and Beatles

You’re more responsive than we thought! Tim discovers a cache of listener e-mail he didn’t notice before; he reads the messages and discusses with Mulele.

These sites are referenced:

Boom! Studios’ Mr. Stuffins was originally launched as a three-issue miniseries in 2007, but it was left unfinished. It appeared more recently as a completed graphic novel, with the same script (almost) but a different art team, giving us an opportunity to compare the choices that the two different art teams made on presenting the same story.

A comic about the Beatles! Sounds pretty cool, right? Well, The Beatles Experience (from Bluewater Comics) gets praise for presenting the Fab Four within their historical and musical context, and including some interesting anecdotes — but without a speck of sourcing. Worse yet, it veers into straight fiction in a couple of particularly egregious ways…

Finally, Mulele gives Tim some more pointers on his art. See the discussed illustrations below the break…

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