#521 Kaigai Manga Festa 2016, part two!

Kaigai Manga Festa 2016

Part two of our roundup of creators who tabled at this year’s Kaiga Manga Festa, including talks with Graeme Mc Nee, Matthew Forsythe, Karl Kerschl, and our own Mulele!

Creators show their work to editors at Comitia, the larger festival alongside Kaigai on October 23, 2016

Continue reading #521 Kaigai Manga Festa 2016, part two!

#520 Kaigai Manga Festa 2016, part one!

Kaigai Manga Festa 2016

It’s time for another Kaigai Manga Festa roundup! This year’s international comics festival in Tokyo was held on October 23 at Tokyo Big Sight, alongside the Comitia festival as always. Tim caught up with some familiar faces and met some new ones as well!

Continue reading #520 Kaigai Manga Festa 2016, part one!

#516 Irene jumps in the freelance (Gwen)pool

gwenpoolIrene Strychalski makes her fourth appearance on the podcast — this time as a full-time freelancer getting work from Marvel! We’ll talk about her depressing early comic, drawing from her own scripts vs. someone else’s, things people say to her when she draws in cafes, and more.

#515 Box Brown talks “Tetris”

TetrisIn his new nonfiction graphic novel Tetris: The Games People Play, Box Brown explores not only the amazing story of the creation of the popular game and the fight over the rights to it, but the larger point of how and why humans began to play games.

In this episode, Box Brown also talks with Tim about his publishing imprint, his earlier book on Andre the Giant, and more.

Critiquing Comics #097: Observatory

ObservatorySubmitted for your approval: a web site that asks the question: What if The Twilight Zone was a series of one-page comics? Tim and Mulele discuss Observatory, by Laszlo Tamasfi and various artists.

#514 “How to Survive in the North”

Dogsled

Luke Healy’s How to Survive in the North presents two different early-20th-century expeditions to the Arctic, and how they were connected. Well, except some of the connections are unclear, and Tim and Kumar both had the same misunderstanding about the book the first time through! Yet the book does present some amazing people and incidents. Here’s our review.

Editorial Cartoonist in Beijing: An interview with Luo Jie

On my recent trip to Beijing, I talked to Liu Jing for the podcast. I had hoped to also speak with China Daily editorial cartoonist Luo Jie, but unfortunately he was out of town when I was there. As it happened, his preference was to do the interview in written form, anyway, so here’s my conversation with him:

Did you grow up reading comics? Making comics?

Like the vast majority of Chinese children, my growth process was accompanied by reading comics. I was born in 1978; in that era, there were few decent comic book publications. It was very common that many children would have to share one comic book. Relative to the shortage of comic books, I preferred watching cartoons on television. There were a lot of animated cartoons, whether Chinese or foreign.  I was very willing to copy some favorite cartoon characters in “Saint Seiya” and “Transformers”. That was the greatest pleasure of my childhood.

What were/are your favorites?

US editorial cartoons are my favorite.  I like funny comics too, especially nonsensical comics, just like those drawn by Japanese cartoonist Rumiko Takahashi.

Continue reading Editorial Cartoonist in Beijing: An interview with Luo Jie

Critiquing Comics #045: “Yuki vs. Panda”

A Japanese girl has an altercation with a panda cub at the zoo! That’s the setup for this Asia-themed, mangaesque comic. Fresh off its successful Indiegogo crowdfunding project, Yuki vs. Panda faces its next test: a critique by Tim and Mulele! Will it survive?!

#347 Deb Aoki: Manga geek extraordinaire

Deb AokiEnglish-speaking manga fans are probably familiar with the name Deb Aoki. She covers Japanese comics for about.com, and is deeply into manga and anything remotely related to it. Deb made a manga geek pilgrimage to Japan recently, and Tim had a chance to sit down and talk with her about Japan, the changing manga culture in the US, and much more.

Critiquing Comics 015: Time-Travelling

Time-TravellingA short but mind-bending scientific/philosophical comic: “Time-Travelling” by Kevin Huizinga, who does some amazing things with the comics medium to make his points. We pull it up on the “What things do” site and discuss.